Posts Tagged ‘houses’

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

Tree house doodle

treehouse Tree house doodle

Doodle a tree of houses

This is literally a tree house doodle, here I’ve drawn a series of my row houses up the trunk of a tree.

One of the nice things about houses that are stacked on top of each other is that you get to draw fun accents like stairs and ladders – because the designs are fanciful they don’t actually have to be serious so you can drape your stairs in loops and waves and your houses don’t have to be engineered to actually sit where they are – just sketch your houses and wrap the tree around them. In my drawing you’ll see a set of windows inside the tree making this a tree house as well.

 

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Friday, December 5th, 2014

Drawing – Hill Houses

hillhouses Drawing   Hill Houses

Doodling hill houses

Just one tiny, fanciful step beyond drawing row houses is stacking the houses up a hill. Drawing hill houses gives your doodles more dimension and opens up wonderful opportunities to add ladders and steps and antennae and lights. Stick to your basic house shape and add a few similar designs – keeping the overall style homogenous.

I love to add lights and ladders – it doesn’t matter that there are no doors to join them to – this is doodling at its most fun.

 

 

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Saturday, July 12th, 2014

Drawing row houses in an industrial setting

power lines Drawing row houses in an industrial setting

 

My love affair with drawing row houses

I love to draw row houses – I think it harks back to my love of Australian terrace houses and those that you find in the UK too.

Here I’ve combined row houses with electricity pylons. We used to drive by really big pylons when we were kids and en route to our holiday destination and I really love their size and majesty. I shot a lot of them too in the UK on a canal boat trip – they started to appear as we got closer into London.

So here is yet another image in my row house series. Houses and pylon – rendered in ink using Sakura Pigma markers.
 

 Helen Bradley

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Friday, January 31st, 2014

Valentine Houses – hand drawn and inked design


valentine houses Valentine Houses   hand drawn and inked design

How to draw Valentine houses as a framed image

This is another in my houses collection. This time I drew the houses inside a hand drawn oval frame. The houses lean together so I decided to give it a Valentine theme with one of the houses blowing heart shaped smoke from its chimney. The design was hand drawn and then inked with a permanent marker. I’ve been adding stairs to my houses a bit lately to give real folks access to them – of course the stairs don’t actually line up at a door – you can’t have everything!

The color is courtesy of a Tombow marker for the outside of the frame and the bunting. The inside colors are Prismacolor two tip markers – I use a Deco Pink, Cool Gray and some sort of blue – not sure what. The Prismacolor markers are kind of cool as you can build up color with them so you don’t get a necessarily flat color but you can make it more dimensional as I have here.

 

 

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Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

How to draw – a row house drawing exercise

beach houses row how to draw How to draw   a row house drawing exercise

Learn to draw row houses with this cute house drawing exercise

Here is a fun exercise for learning and practicing to draw houses and row houses. In this first example, above, is a series of beach bathing boxes like they have at some of the beaches in Australia such as Brighton Beach and Mornington Beach.

As with the example in my previous post, start with a line for the ground and then some little boxes. Pencil in the roof lines and then try for some variety in the decorations, doors and windows. Think of seaside things like striped paneling, life buoys, satellite dishes and large numbers. Pencil these in before going over everything with a pen.

I don’t usually color my pieces beyond some grey color applied using a Prismacolor pen. However in this case I scanned the drawing into a new document and opened it in Photoshop. I fixed the lines and then colored the background and the sand.

more cute row houses How to draw   a row house drawing exercise

 

Here is another set of houses, again little boxes with pointed roofs. I looked for some variety in roofs and even added a ladder, a shut up house and one with a Volkswagen in the carport.

If you want to see the earlier post with the step by step for creating the houses, here is what I drew and a link to the post.

row houses1 How to draw   a row house drawing exercise

 

 

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Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

How to draw houses – step by step

row houses How to draw houses   step by step

Learn how to draw one house or a row of them, step by step

I love drawing houses but it took a fair bit of research and sketching until I found my style and then, I sometimes need to shake it up so I don’t repeat the basic shapes over and over.

If you’re starting out, as with anything worth learning, you will want to practice  until you find what you like to draw and find the styles that you like to use.

Here is a way to have fun drawing houses. It is a step by step approach and it starts with a line for the ground and some boxes on top. Use a nice soft pencil so it erases away at the end and press lightly. I like to use a 2B propelling pen – it’s hard to get leads for but it is awesome and never needs sharpening! I seldom erase anything but sometimes I have to draw over the lines a few time to get them right.

how to draw a set of row houses How to draw houses   step by step

Once the boxes are drawn I start drawing in the roof lines, windows and some other small details. You will want to have a few different shapes so experiment with them. Again, it is seldom necessary to erase lines and instead just draw those you want to use.

When that is done, start inking in the details. If I made a mistake in the pencil lines I’ll often correct these as I ink the shapes and not even redraw the line in pencil. I have a damaged .005 black pen which I use a lot and sometimes a .02 but seldom anything any wider. I use Sakura Pigma Micron markers and I really like them.

Finally, I thicken up the lines, in particular in the places where the lines join – I use a .005 for that.  Then I finish off with a Prismacolor marker in Cool Grey for the roofs and small details. If I scan the art then I remove the fill color by erasing it in Photoshop and then I color it digitally.

 

 

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