Posts Tagged ‘blanket stitch’

Sunday, July 26th, 2015

Woven / Whipped Running Stitch Embroidery

woven stitch embroidery Woven / Whipped Running Stitch Embroidery

 

Weave thread to add depth and interest to running stitches

It’s been a while since I posted some of my felt circles. I love sewing these because they are small enough that you finish them pretty quickly and you can assemble them into other things like needle books and use them to embellish small pouches.

This one is layers of brown and blue felt and brown and blue threads. I always use wool felt or a blend that has a high proportion of wool and DMC Pearl Cotton thread because of its great handle and its lustre.

Here I stitched a simple blanket stitch on the inside, chain stitch in pale blue thread and then multiple rows of woven running stitch. So here’s the low down on weaving stitches – if you do it as I have and thread through each stitch the same direction it doesn’t matter whether you have an even or odd number of stitches to thread through. If you do a full loop type of stitch in a full circle then you have to have an even number of stitches which means you need to count – for me that is so NOT happening!

So, to get this awesome result, plan to thread your second thread the same way through each stitch, such as come down from the top and you get a lovely even weave and it works the same on even and odd numbers of stitches.

This is the woven stitch I use – it doesn’t need any special stitch count:

how to do a woven stitch Woven / Whipped Running Stitch Embroidery

This form of woven running stitch requires an even number of stitches for it to be used around a shape:

woven stitch v2 Woven / Whipped Running Stitch Embroidery

 

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Sunday, July 12th, 2015

Mini Cloud Embroidery with Beads

felt clouds 2 Mini Cloud Embroidery with Beads

Multi Layer Felt Cloud with Beaded Accents

This is the second cloud embroidery piece I have done lately. In this one, I layered four felt clouds one on top of the other and sewed them with embroidery stitches. The smallest felt cloud is cream, then it was dusty blue, crimson red and grey. I used running stitch on the smallest three clouds and blanket stitch on the outer one. If you’re not sure how to do blanket stitch I’ve included a small “how to” below that will show you how it is done.

I added a series of seed beads in similar colors as the ‘rain’. The beads are threaded onto very light wire and, at the end of each is a small teardrop shape bead.

The embroidery is on grey linen and uses DMC Pearl Cotton and I used wool blend felt. I like working in natural materials like linen and wool felt – wool felt in particular because it is stronger than the plastic stuff and it doesn’t disintegrate when cut in small pieces. Pearl Cotton has a wonderful luster which adds just the right amount of shine to the embroidery. The piece is small – just 4″ in size.

 

cloud embroidery felt Mini Cloud Embroidery with Beads

If you want to make this yourself, here is a free pattern. You just need to print it at the desired size and then cut out the felt fabric pieces.

free multi layer felt cloud template Mini Cloud Embroidery with Beads

And, here is how to do blanket stitch. It can be done with the thread on the outside or the inside, this is the outside version.

zoom 2 Mini Cloud Embroidery with Beads

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Monday, June 8th, 2015

Sewing Felt Oranges and Lemons

oranges and lemons in felt 4 Sewing Felt Oranges and Lemons

Learn to cut & sew felt oranges, lemons and limes

Citrus shapes are shapes you see around a lot. I think it is the color – the combination of yummy orange, yellow or green with the white of the fruit’s pith is a great contrast. The colors and shapes of a sliced piece of fruit lends itself to be rendered in felt. These projects are quick and simple enough for the beginner to sew which is great because you get a lot of dash for a minimal expenditure of time and learning. They also don’t take up a lot of product so you get quite a bit of sewing from just a couple of sheets of felt.

Now I like to use wool felt or at least felt with a high proportion of wool in it when I sew. It’s important that you use good quality felt for this project because the pieces are so small and you really need to be able to cut them neatly and to ensure when you sew them that the felt doesn’t pull away from the stitches. Cheap felt tends to fall apart when it is cut into small pieces and when you have to sew close to the edges. Good quality felt will stand up to being cut into small pieces and being sewn using small stitches.

Start by making a pattern by drawing a set of concentric circles. I find it easiest to draw the pattern on paper and then use the pattern as a template for cutting the felt. I start by drawing and cutting the outer piece, then I cut it a bit smaller each time until I arrive at the middle piece. I call this a lossy pattern because the pattern gets destroyed in the process but it’s easy to do. I’ve given you a template here that you can use if you need to do so – just copy it at the size you want it to be.

citrus pattern1 Sewing Felt Oranges and Lemons

When cutting the smallest pieces – gently round the edges so they aren’t pointy – they look better rounded and they are easier to sew this way.

I like to glue the felt pieces together using a fabric glue stick – it helps stabilize everything while I sew and saves having to use a lot of pins. I hate using pins because they always seem to stick into me so I end up feeling like a human pincushion.

Then start sewing – I use white thread on the white pieces and a matching thread on the color pieces – sometimes the color thread I use is a bit lighter or darker – I find that a difference in shade matters less than getting the wrong color. Get the wrong orange or the wrong green and it looks bad. Get a lighter or darker version of the same color and it all looks just fine.

oranges and lemons felt emboidery 2 Sewing Felt Oranges and Lemons

Here I’ve sewn split stitch around the lemon pieces and around the edges in the orange. In the orange segments I stitched a very simple seed stitch with the stitches all going in pretty much the same direction.

 

oranges and lemons in felt 2 Sewing Felt Oranges and Lemons

Here the felt pieces have been sewn to a backing fabric and embroidered with blanket stitch, running stitch, seed stitch and split stitch.

oranges and lemons in felt 3 Sewing Felt Oranges and Lemons

And then the finished piece is assembled into a flexi hoop – I love these cute hoops which I get from an Etsy seller – these hoops are faux wood (although they also come in red, pink and white). You just put the embroidery over the backing ring and then push the flexible outer ring on top. Everything gets held in place nice and securely.

oranges and lemons in felt 5 Sewing Felt Oranges and Lemons

I finished this one off with a piece of matt board cut into a small circle – it was small enough to fit inside the inner part of the hoop but large enough to fit securely so it stays in place. It’s a very simple finishing technique – I don’t usually do this but it certainly worked well for this piece.

oranges and lemons in felt 1 Sewing Felt Oranges and Lemons

Another option is to cut the inverse out and design the citrus from there. Then fill the inner bits with your embroidery.

 

oranges and lemons felt emboidery 1 Sewing Felt Oranges and Lemons

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Thursday, December 18th, 2014

Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

cloud reverse applique embroidery 15 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

 

Learn to make a cute reverse applique embroidery

Reverse applique is simple to do and lots of fun. Instead of stitching your shape on top of the fabric you will place it below and cut out a hole to view it through. Here’s how to do it:

Step 1

Draw your design – I used a simple hand drawn cloud and rain drops design. Make sure it will fit comfortably inside the embroidery frame.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 01 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 2

Cut out your pattern and tack it to the front of your main piece of fabric. Place your second (applique) piece of fabric behind the first – if there is a right and wrong side of your fabric, make sure both right sides are facing the same way! I used felt so this wasn’t an issue. Stitch around the shape leaving about 1/4 inch between the pattern edge and your stitch lines. These stitches will show on the final piece so do them neatly. Stitch through your main and applique fabric. I used couching stitches to run a thicker thread around the shape but you could use back stitch or even stem stitch.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 02 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 3
cloud reverse applique embroidery 03 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 4

Embroider any other elements – I added some rain drops using detached chain stitch.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 04 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 5

Admire your work so far.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 05 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 6

Using the paper template as a guide, very carefully cut the template shape out of the top fabric without cutting through the applique fabric. Take your time to cut neatly and carefully.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 06 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 7

Make sure your piece will still fit comfortably inside your frame.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 07 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 8

Using a suitable thread – I used Clover Silk, stitch around the cut edge sewing the edge to the applique below. Use any appropriate stitch such as a hem stitch or even blanket stitch.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 08 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 9

I used Blanket Stitch.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 09 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 10

Flip the piece over and trim the applique fabric close to the edge of the design.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 10 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 11

Place the finished piece inside your frame.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 11 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 12

Trim the front fabric to around 3/4 inch all round.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 12 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 13

Run a loose running stitch around the edge and pull firmly on both ends to gather the excess fabric. Knot the thread to hold the gathers in place. Make a template for the back of the frame and cut a piece of felt to size using the template.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 13 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 14

Tack the felt to the fabric all around to finish the back of the embroidery neatly.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 14 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 15

All done!
cloud reverse applique embroidery 15 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

Step 16

Close up.
cloud reverse applique embroidery 16 Mini Reverse Applique and Embroidered Cloud

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Saturday, June 15th, 2013

Recycled clothing price tag project – woven earrings

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 9 Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

Create these fun woven earrings using recycled clothing price tags and some cotton fiber

I’m rolling along with my recycled clothing tag project with a new project for today – making woven earrings. You will need some cotton thread – I have some left over from a crochet project that is nice and colorful and I had plenty to use. You will also need a pair of matching clothing tags, a hole punch, some earring findings, a large eye needle – not very sharp and scissors.

Start with the tags and punch the holes – I did a grid of 4 x 6 holes on each tag. You will want holes all around and large enough to take multiple threads. If the tags have tear off pieces, leave these on the outside in case they come off. I kept mine in place till the very end but then they came off!

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 1 Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

This is what the front of the tags look like and here is the back. You can see I didn’t do anything to the tags to hide the details on them – and that was my plan all along but you could do something different if you wish.

Once I had the holes, I started weaving. I started with medium pink cotton and wove a set of lines across the tags, both the back and the front are done so they look the same. Always start on the reverse side so the long tails of thread are on the reverse and ignore them.

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 2 Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 2 back Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

Having done that – still using the same color I went back in the reverse direction to make a square grid – again both sides of each tag look basically the same.

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 3 Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 3 back Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

Now I changed color for the first time. And this time, I chose a very light pink and wove it diagonally in one direction making sure that the pattern stayed correct on both sides of the tags – you may need to check carefully that the lines are all parallel and that it looks right. Don’t bother doing anything about the loose ends – just leave them hanging off the piece.

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 4 Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 4 back Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

After going in a diagonal direction in one color I changed colors to a dark pink and went in the opposite diagonal direction. Again, keep an eye out on the weave to make sure it is correct.

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 5 Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 5 back Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

Now the fun stuff starts. I changed to the lime green and started doing the cross weave.

Again you will be going in and out through the holes following the diagonals and making sure to do the same on the back as on the front. The difference is that here you will be doing a little cross stitch over and around the woven threads that are all piled up at this point to hold them together.

You will see that there is a simple pattern to doing this which makes it all repeatable, just take it slowly and make sure it all looks even and neat.

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 6 Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 6 back Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

Now, still working in green I went in and out around the very edge of the pieces – it is so weird but it all worked perfectly so there wasn’t even any doubling up of thread. You should still be ignoring the problem of the loose ends!

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 7 Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 7 back Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

Now it is time to deal with the problem ends. Since you always started on the reverse side your tails should all be on the back so make sure they are or thread them so they are.

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 8 Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 8 back Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

Now, working in green, I worked a set of blanket stitches over the green thread around the edge. You will fit 4-6 blanket stitches on each thread – just do however many you need on each piece they don’t have to all be the same. Work the back and the front.

When you are working around the edges on the back – hold the loose threads alongside the green edge threads as you work so you catch all the threads up in the blanket stitch to hide them.

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 8a Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

Once this is done you can assemble your findings. If you’re not confident setting eyelets then test this out on a scrap piece of paper first – I promise you that this is vital. You might notice that the eyelets set out here are a different size to the final image? Yep! I made a mess of my first eyelets and had to pull them out and start over. If I’d practiced first I would have realized that my tools wouldn’t work properly and I needed to overcome some technical issues first.

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 8b Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

Punch a hole and affix the eyelets and then add a jump ring and an earring wire to each earring.

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 9 Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

Then you are done and ready to wear your new woven clothing price tag earrings.

recycled clothing tags woven sewn earrings 9 back Recycled clothing price tag project   woven earrings

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Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Embroidered Circles #25 – White on white circles

embroiderd felt circles 25 Embroidered Circles #25   White on white circles

 

The big challenge with this color scheme is that it is white on white on white on white! Needless to say I didn’t pick the colors – someone else did for me. I always get a challenge when someone else picks the colors and this was a big one. I wanted to use edge stitching that drew attention to the edges because precious else would.

Row 1: Blanket Stitch – the outside edge is along the felt edge.

Row 2: A mini sort of edging stitch started out being scroll stitch but ended up being a small blanket stitch. There are limits to just how close you can get to the edge of a circle of felt even when it is wool blend! Looped around the outside of this is a set of loop stitches.

The filler stitch is alternating colored french knots.

Row 3: Cross stitch – each stitch is bumped up against the next.

The center is my floral stitch – lines of stitches pulled into a flower shape.

Dare I say it, I think I’ll be cutting out another set of white circles later on and trying this again. It was a great challenge and I think I can  do better still.

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Saturday, February 9th, 2013

Felt embroidered circles #23 – more flower stitch goodness

embroiderd felt circles 23 Felt embroidered circles #23   more flower stitch goodnessThis is another of the felt circle projects that incorporates a flower center used to sew on the bead. I also used a whipped running stitch all around the larger circle in brown and tan cotton that looks just so amazing and is so simple to do.

The color scheme is an old favorite you just cannot go wrong with brown and blue – or pink and brown for that matter, they were made for each other. This scheme is brown and tan and two blues – one light and bright one and one sort of dusty turquoise. The thread are, as always, DMC #5 pearlized cotton – it is a treat to sew with and way worth the price.

Row 1: Blanket stitch – the edge of the stitch is on the outside here. The uprights for the stitch have been used to help anchor the stitches which attach the bead in this amazing flower shape.

Row 2: Chain stitch. Another simple stitch that looks great in a contrasting color.

Row 3: Lots of rows of whipped running stitch – first sew the running stitch then whip it by looping a thread in and out of it as required. The whipped effect lifts the running stitches and gives the project some extra dimension.

 

 

 

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Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

Felt circles #22 – Easter Theme and a flower center

embroidered felt circle with flower attachment for bead Felt circles #22   Easter Theme and a flower center

 

This is the latest in my felt circles project. If you’ve been following my blog you will know that I have been embroidering felt circles for some time now. This one marks a slight change in direction. With this one I discovered that I could make flowers on the bead by stitching the bead on using pairs of stitches all around. Then between the pairs I looped some thread around the stitches and pulled it a little bit and voila! a flower – it is totally awesome. I plan to do a post on this process but for now, here is this project.

I didn’t pick the colors for this – someone else did but I really like them. They are bright without being over the top and the stitching came out looking great.

Row 1: Trusty blanket stitch. Depending how you start it the line can be on the outside or inside edge of the stitches. Here it is  on the inside and I used it to catch the stitches anchoring the bead to make the flower.

Row 2: Double chain stitch. This is a good stitch for going over the border of two pieces of fabric and, when you look at it you can see the double chain bit – the chains are laid down almost side by side instead of one in front of the other.

Row 3: Love this. It is a filling stitch called Cloud Filling. You make a set of offset very small straight stitches in two rows and then loop a thread through them – I used a contrasting thread and the effect is a sort of curvy stitch. These filling stitches that have multiple colors aren’t much more effort than a regular stitch but they look great and they are well worth the effort of making them.

 

 

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Thursday, January 10th, 2013

More mini felt house goodness

felt covered jar mini house 21 More mini felt house goodness

Simple to make and generally awesome are these mini felt houses

Building these felt houses is a fun project – they are small enough to look so cute and there is just enough room to enjoy stitching without getting bored by the repetitiveness of it all. Better still they are a great project for recycling small jars such as jam jars or condiments.

This house is built on a really small jar. It was actually funny, I put the paper mâché cone on top of it and it practically disappeared inside it. It was so freaking cute.

Here’s what you need:

Tiny recycled jar with lid

Paper mâché cone

Felt in assorted colors

DMC #5 Pearl Cotton embroidery thread – assorted colors

Fabric glue stick

Scissors, pen, pencil, paper, embroidery needles

Draw a smallish circle (around 2″ diameter) on a piece of paper, cut it out and fold it in two. Hold it against the bottom edge of the cone as a  template for the half circle cut out. Draw the shape on both sides of the cone so you have a front and back door for the house. You need to make sure that you have a good size cutout so you can see the jar but not so big that you will see the jar lid – the lid has to be well inside the cone.

Once you’re sure it will all work, cut out the two half circles – regular scissors work fine – it is just paper mâché!

From here you can do pretty much as for the earlier house. I made a template for the roof in paper, cut it out in felt and sewed the main seam. Then I trimmed the bottom edge of the felt to around 1/4 inch beyond the edge of the cone. I cut small scallops into the edge and hemmed them with a buttonhole stitch.

I cut small circles of white felt and sewed them onto the roof with chain stitch. When the roof was done I used some fabric glue on the cone and glued the roof in place.

In this case the house was a little easier to do as the jar is round. I still make a pattern from paper and work out where everything will go and test it with the roof in place before doing any sewing. I then cut out the felt leaving a small extra seam allowance, then embroider and appliqué it.

I pin the felt to the jar, trim any excess and sew the seam. Then I cut a piece of felt the size of the base of the jar plus 1/8 in and sew it  to the sides.

When I am done, I glue the felt to the jar, glue the lid inside the cone and it’s all done.

I am imagining a small cluster of these houses – and perhaps some trees to go around them… right now … all in the planning stage.

felt covered jar mini house 11 More mini felt house goodness

 

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Thursday, December 27th, 2012

Have a whale of a time making this felt whale!

whale Have a whale of a time making this felt whale!

This felt whale is easy to make and very cute to boot.

I’ve been playing around with making my own stuffed creatures from wool felt and my own patterns. So far I have made an elephant, some hot air balloons, a  helicopter and now a whale.

This little guy is made in blue felt but he could be any color. I filled him with some pony beads to make him more stable but next time I’d add a sealed bag of sand instead – I’m becoming a fan of sand in the base of these pieces as it weighs quite heavy, you can sew it into a little pouch to use really easily and it’s natural!

The pattern is free – from me – and you can download it here.

You will need:

blue wool felt (body, back and flippers)

white wool felt (belly and eyes)

pink wool felt (mouth)

black wool felt (pupils)

fiberfill

needle and thread

sand or something to weigh it down with

Cut two body pieces and a long strip which goes from the head across to the tail – all in one color is good. Also cut four flippers from this color.  Cut a belly piece and eyeballs from white, and pupils and mouth. Please, do yourself a favor and use wool felt because it really is far superior to the other stuff. Wool felt stands up better to being stitched close to the edge and it really feels much nicer to work with.

Sew eyeballs and pupils in place on the face.

Sew the mouth to the body both sides then add the belly piece and stuff it with fiber fill as you go. Add a pouch of sand or something to weigh him down and continue to sew him up inserting the belly and long back strip between each side as you go.

When he is all sewn up sew the flippers together in pairs and stuff as you go. Sew to the body in a position they can help support him and you’re done. He would look great in a mobile for a kids room or he’s happy to sit on your desk to keep you company too.

 

 

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